Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Taping Rainwater on Himalayan Mountains of Uttarkhand

Taping Rainwater on Himalayan Mountains of Uttarkhand

A collaborative effort of  KSCST, Govt. of Uttarkhand, UNDP and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation 

Place name is Pheri village, Pheri - Kimora Gram Panchayat, Jaunpur Block, Tehri Garhwal district in Uttarkhand, Northern India  at an altitude of 2000 meters, closest town Mussoorie. 
September 20th marked a day to introduce Rainwater Harvesting (RWH) in the region and build skills among the local youth.
A cost effective, rugged and sustainable model of RWH was demonstrated and built at one location and for subsequent replication in 10 houses :
Himalayan hilly terrain
Pheri Kimora Gram Panchayat - House owner : Ramachandra
The house is on the first floor and the ground floor is the cattle shed to keep the house warm during winter. The building  roof, which is inclined on both sides is made of corrugated sheet metal (40 ft long and 18 ft wide). 
House for RWH
The galvanised colour coated steel sheet gutters (nala) are installed for the full length of the roof at the lower end on either side of the house.  Metal clamps are fixed at regular intervals to hold the gutter in position and also to provide slope for rainwater to flow towards one side.
Galvanised colour coated steel sheet gutters (nala)





The rainwater from the gutter is guided to 75mm PVC pipes and the pipes from both side of the house are interlinked in the front side of the house. 



First Flush Lock (FFL) and diverter drum mounted on the floor  receives the roof water at its inlet.

First Flush Lock (FFL) and diverter drum                Sand or small aggregates 


First five minutes initial flow of roof top rainwater with contaminants like dust, bird droppings, tree leaves etc will get stored in the FFL drum and subsequently the gas filled valve will automatically close the inlet of the drum to allow the cleaner water to flow in to the HDPE tank.


Round platform for placing HDPE tank                                HDPE tank with sand bed filter

A sand bed filter (aluminium perforated bowl filled with sand or small aggregates) placed at the mouth of the manhole of the HDPE tank is used for final polishing of rainwater. The filtered water from the sand bed is allowed to flow in to the tank. Round platform is built using local stones and cement to an height of 18 inches at the ground level beside the house for placing the HDPE tank of 2000 liters capacity. 





The filtered rain water is stored in the HDPE tank in the absence of light. The tap at the bottom of the HDPE tank can be used to collect clean rainwater which can be used for domestic needs. The roof of around 720 sqft / 67 sqm can provide around 1,00,000 liters of clean rainwater per year. The tank of 2000 liters will get filled in a day of just 30mm or little more than one inch rainfall.


Sharing the experience of rainwater harvesting and building water security among the most HUMBLE LOCAL COMMUNITY, was a truly joyous experience.
Tehri Garhwal is one of the Himalayan hilly terrain district of  Uttarkhand state of India. The economy is mainly agrarian, despite most of the land being unfit for cultivation owing to the precipitous and rocky slopes. The region has many power projects and enjoys almost uninterrupted electricity. Winding roads are in poor condition owing to the frequent landslides.


The region is in the foothills of the Garhwal Himalayan range. Being at an average altitude of 2000 metres, Tehri Garhwal, with its green hills and varied flora and fauna, is a fascinating hill range. Commanding snow ranges to the northeast and glittering views of the Doon Valley and Shiwalik ranges in the south, the nearest town Mussoorie was once said to present a 'fairyland' atmosphere to tourists.
The story of 'Pheri'  
The region has an annual rainfall of around 2000mm and the river Aglad (tributary of Tons which is the tributary of Yamuna) flows at the bottom of the valley . Several kilometres uphill, villages with scattered houses are dependent on springs and streams for daily water needs. Steep slope drain off rainwater quickly and water reaches the bottom of the hill to join the river Aglad. Villagers (mostly woman) trek few kilometres to collect water and carry water on their back climbing the steep slippery winding walk paths through thick woods. My mobile camera could capture waterfalls and the flowing river, but are not of reach by villagers (mirage). Few rich among them hire daily labour to haul water. It is common for grownup boys to leave the village and move down hill to towns (Dehradun) because of water scarcity. Tourist across the country and even from outside India reach here for adventure trekking in Himalayan hills and water sports in Tons river, just few kilometres uphill, people decamp their villages because of non availability of WATER.
'Harvest Rainwater and a Host of  Benefits'


Thank you KSCST, Govt of Uttarkhand,  UNDP, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation - Rashmi Bajaj, Subrato Paul, Waseem Yousf, Shreyansh, Neeraj Kumar Sharma, and more so for the PEOPLE of  Pheri Kimora.

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

My journey to Sikkim for building water security through Rainwater Harvesting

My journey to Sikkim for building water security through Rainwater Harvesting - a collaborative effort of  KSCST, Govt. of Sikkim and UNDP

Place name is Suldung, Upper Kamling, at an altitude of 2560 meters, closest town Jorethang, West Sikkim. August 2nd marked a day to introduce rainwater harvesting in the region and build skills among the local youth.



Sharing the experience of rainwater harvesting and building water security among the most HUMBLE LOCAL COMMUNITY, was a truly joyous experience.
West Sikkim is a district of the Indian state of Sikkim. The economy is mainly agrarian, despite most of the land being unfit for cultivation owing to the precipitous and rocky slopes. The region has many power projects and enjoys almost uninterrupted electricity. Roads are in poor condition owing to the frequent landslides. West Sikkim houses a great diversity of flora and fauna, many of which are used by Indigenous and local communities. Most of the district is hilly, it enjoys a temperate climate. Above 3,800 m (12,000 ft) the slopes are full of rhododendron forests.
The story of 'Suldung'  - The region has an annual rainfall of around 2000mm and the roaring river Rangeet (tributary of Teesta) flows ferociously in the valley. Several kilometres uphill, villages with scattered houses are dependent on springs and streams for daily water needs. Steep slope drain off rainwater quickly and water reaches the bottom of the hill to join the river Rangeet. Villagers (mostly woman) trek few kilometres to collect water and carry water on their back climbing the steep slippery winding walk paths through thick woods. 

My mobile camera could capture waterfalls and the flowing river, but are not of reach by villagers (mirage). Few rich among them hire daily labour to haul water. It is common for grownup boys to leave the village and move down hill to towns because of water scarcity. Tourist across the country and even from outside India reach here for adventure water rafting in Teesta, just few kilometres uphill, people decamp their villages because of non availability of WATER. 

'Harvest Rainwater and a Host of benefits'


Thank you KSCST, DST, Govt of Sikkim -Dorjee Thinlay Bhutia, Suman Thapa, 
UNDP - Surajit Baruah, Rowena Mathew, Sanjeeb Pradan and more so for the PEOPLE of Suldung.













Monday, 10 July 2017

It is my honour to share the experience of my life on water conservation at NINASAM

Dear Friends,
On 16th July 2017Sunday, commemorating the 12th death anniversary of KV Subbanna,
NINASAM has organised the following events at Heggodu:
4 pmSpecial Lecture: Neerina Bikkattannu Meeruva Daarigalu: AR Shivkumar, KSCST, IISc, Bangalore
7 pmNinasam playTataki Mardana, Based on Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew
Directed by Manujunatha L. Badigera.
Please do come.


Akshara K.V.
Ninasam/Akshara Prakashana, HEGGODU, Sagara Taluka, Shimoga District, Karnataka 577 417
Ph: (Office: NInasam) 08183-265646; (Akshara Prakashana) 08183-265476, Res: 08183-265723
www.ninasam.org


Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Water tankers being hijacked in Bangalore!

Water tankers being hijacked in Bangalore!


Do not be surprised if you read / hear this as headlines in your news.

Save Water Save Bangalore

Many citizens of Bangalore have not felt the heat of water crisis looming large in the next one or two months. No exaggeration. The water available in Cauvery river and the KRS dam is at its lowest in decades! Most of the borewells / tubewells have gone dry or are yielding very low water. 
New borewells are being drilled day in and day out, touching unheard of depths - 1000 feet and more.
However, we still see each day on the streets of Bangalore - 
Cars are being washed with hose pipes.
House fronts and roads being sprayed with water in buckets and hose pipes.
Overhead water tanks and underground sumps overflow with none paying heed. 
Are we blind to these acts?
Can we take the first step to stop these? 
Do we not have the social responsibility to save whatsoever available water, to conserve and share equitably among all sections of our society?

If not, WATER EMERGENCY may have to be declared???

Save Water Save Bangalore












Wednesday, 29 March 2017

NDTV - Bengaluru Man Hasn't Paid Water Bill In 22 Years. Why That's A Good Thing



Article link:

Bengaluru Man Hasn't Paid Water Bill In 22 Years. Why That's A Good Thing
Bengaluru | Written by Maya Sharma | Updated: March 27, 2017 23:41 IST
 AR Shivakumar's house has a water storage capacity of 45,000 litres
BENGALURU:  The family of a senior scientist in Bengaluru has not paid their water bill for 22 years. Reason: AR Shivakumar is doing without a water connection, using treated rainwater not just for bathing and washing, but also for drinking. The senior scientist at Karnataka State Council for Science and Technology had designed his green home more than two decades ago - building in a water harvesting system that yields more than 400 litres of water daily. Which means the expected scanty rainfall this year - when the state is facing is second consecutive year of drought - will be enough for their needs.

"Bangalore receives around 900-1000mm of rainfall except for these very drought years," said Mr Shivakumar, whose work involves the field of renewable energy and rainwater harvesting. The amount, he says, is enough to collect 2.3 lakh litres of water a year. But 2.3 lakh liters is far more than an average family of four uses. Planned properly, tanks can be built into a standard 40/60 feet plot to store more than what a small family needs.

Explaining the rainfall pattern of the city, he said, there is 90-100 dry days between two successive rains in Bangalore. "Based on that calculation, we have a storage capacity for 45000 litres... effectively we need only around 40,000 litres - 400 liters a day for 100 days. But we have 45,000 litres for emergency."
 

AR Shivakumar had built his home over two decades ago
His family, he said, approximately uses 400 litres a day. "In a year, we need only 1 to 1.5 lakh litres, so much more than we require is coming here," he added.


The use of water, though, is careful, he said. Recycling plays a big part -- like collecting water from the kitchen sink in a can outside the kitchen to using water from the washing machine to flush toilets.

The water harvesting system is simple - water from the sloping roof is collected n underground tanks, where the purification process happens.

It is a family effort, said Mr Sivakumar - and his wife of 28 years, Suma, and his son, Anoop and daughter in law, Vamika, play their part as water conservation becomes a way of life for them.




Friday, 17 March 2017

Save Water Save Bangalore Campaign 2017

“Save Water Save Bengaluru” Campaign

The failure of rains in the monsoon and depleting water availability in KRS dam and also ground water in Bangalore may cause sevier water shortage in the summer months. Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) with the technical support of Karnataka State Council for Science and Technology (KSCST) initiated the programme to bring in awareness in Bangalore for water conservation to avert drinking water crisis in and around Bangalore.

Save Water Save Bengaluru” Campaign was flagged off on 22nd March 2017, Wednesday on the occasion of “World Water Day” at Vidhana Soudha, Bengaluru.

Honorable Chief Minister of Karnataka Sri Siddaramaiah with Minister Sri K. J .George, Sri Tushaar Girinath, IAS, Chairman, BWSSB, Sri Kemparamaiah, Engineer in Chief, BWSSB, Sri A.R. Shivakumar, PI, RWH, KSCST, IISc , Sri P. N. Ravindra, Additional Chief Engineer, New Initiatives and Public Outreach, BWSSB, Smt. P.G. R. Sindhia and others inaugurated the awareness campaign organized by BWSSB and Government of Karnataka. He also flagged off a 4 km rally to create awareness about water conservation.

Over 300 participated in the awareness campaign “Save Water Save Bengaluru”. BWSSB Team, KSCST Team, Scouts and Guides team, Children from various schools, NGOs, Press, and Media were present. Rally started at Vidhana Soudha and passed through K R Circle, K G road and successfully concluded at the Sewage Treatment Plant at Cubbon Park. A Street Play was also organized a performed by Abhinaya Taranga team.

KSCST provided technical support for educating NGOs and others to run the campaign till the end of May. To conserve water Sri A.R. Shivakumar suggested following three points for the city of Bengaluru and are being advocated by campaign partners:

“Save Water Save Bangalore” - YOU can do it....
1. Used Kitchen sink water can be reused for watering plants.
2. RO reject water can be as high as 70% which can be used for moping and cleaning the floor.
3. Toilet flushing requires 27% of your daily water need and washing machine discharges 22% of  
your daily water need. YOU can save at least 20% of fresh water daily.